Street sweeper Essay

Street sweeper Essay

Social Criticism in Blake’s Chimney Sweeper and Hayden’s Monet’s Waterlilies

– Social Criticism in Blake’s Chimney Sweeper and Hayden’s Monet’s Waterlilies      The late eighteenth century in England children as young as five years of age were bought, sold, and traded into a life that was completely at the mercy of their owner. These were children without a childhood. Almost two hundred years later America followed suit with this behavior as black Americans were forced to sit in the back of buses, use separate facilities, and attend different schools. The corruption of these contrasting societies is vividly depicted in William Blake’s “The Chimney Sweeper” and Robert Hayden’s “Monet’s Waterlilies”, respectively….  

William Blake’s The Chimney-Sweeper, Holy Thursday (Innocence) and London

– Compare and Contrast William Blake’s The Chimney-Sweeper, Holy Thursday (Innocence) and London I am going to compare and contrast three of William Blake poems, where he shows his feelings about the way people treat children: The Chimney-Sweeper, Holy Thursday (Innocence) and London. The Chimney-Sweeper is about a child who sweeps chimneys. William Blake sets this poem in the winter. The children worked in the cold. Blake says, “A little black thing among the snow,” “The little black thing,” Is the child who is dirty from cleaning the chimneys who stands out in the snow….  

The Chimney Sweeper: Dispair

– Throughout the Industrial Revolution in England in the 18th century, many children were forced to work against their own will, to support the growing need for labor in the demanding economy. William Blake’s “The Chimney Sweeper,” meticulously portrays the mindsets of two individuals obligated to carry out these societal expectations of working at a very young age. However, contrary to societies opinion on harmful child labor, Blake uses irony and sarcasm to convey his critical allegation of the wrongdoings of the church and society on their lack of effort to intervene and put an end to the detrimental job of adolescent chimney sweeping….  

Child Labor Exposed in The Chimney Sweeper by William Blake

– In the poem, The Chimney Sweeper by William Blake (1789), the poet attempts to shine a light on the social injustice inflicted upon children by appealing to the reader’s conscience in order to free them from their nightmare existence. He uses a child’s voice as the vehicle to deliver his message in order to draw attention to the injustice of forced child labor. The speaker is a young boy whose mother has passed away. He has no time to properly grieve because his father has sold him into a life of filth and despair….  

William Blake’s The Chimney Sweeper

– William Blake’s The Chimney Sweeper William Blake’s The Chimney Sweeper, written in 1789, tells the story of what happened to many young boys during this time period. Often, boys as young as four and five were sold for the soul purpose of cleaning chimneys because of their small size. These children were exploited and lived a meager existence that was socially acceptable at the time. Blake voices the evils of this acceptance through point of view, symbolism, and his startling irony.      Blake expresses his poem in first person, as a young chimney sweeper….