Secretary clerk Essay

Secretary clerk Essay

The Changes of Womanhood in Marge Piercy‘s “The Secretary Chant”

– Marge Piercy’s “The Secretary Chant” begins the poem by describing different parts of her body as office supplies. In line one she states that “My hips are a desk.” In line two and three she says “From my ears hang/ chains of paper clips.”(2) In line four she also continues with “Rubber bands form my hair.”(3) I feel like Piercy’s goal by starting off the poem in this way, was to help emphasize the speakers frustrations toward her job right away. I also feel that by comparing the speakers body parts to office supplies, gives the feeling that the speaker is using a form of sarcasm; which explains how much her job is unwillingly becoming apart of her life….  

The Suffering Griselda in The Clerk’s Tale

–     In Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Clerk’s Tale,” from The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer describes a “perfect wife.”  This wife, Griselda, is totally submissive to her husband, and seems to have no regrets or remorse for anything he makes her do.  Griselda’s husband, Walter, puts her through many trials in order to test her dedication and loyalty to him.  He takes away both of their children, telling her that he is going to have them killed.  He then tells her that he is divorcing her and taking another bride.  After this, he forces her to prepare the new bride for him.  Through all of this, Griselda loves Walter without fail, meets his demands without any word of disapproval, and remains faithful…  

Summary and Analysis of The Clerk’s Tale

– Summary and Analysis of The Clerk’s Tale (The Canterbury Tales) Prologue to the Clerk’s Tale: The Host remarks that the Clerk of Oxford sits quietly, and tells him to be more cheerful. The Host asks the Clerk to tell a merry tale of adventure and not a moralistic sermon. The Clerk agrees to tell a story that he learned from a clerk at Padua, Francis Petrarch. He then praises the renowned Petrarch for his sweet rhetoric and poetry. The Clerk does warn that Petrarch, before his tale, wrote a poem in a high style exalting the Italian landscape….  

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales – Biblical Reference in The Clerk’s Tale

– Biblical Reference in The Clerk’s Tale         In 1921, Vance Palmer, the famous Australian author and poet, noted, in his essay titled “On Boundaries”, that “it is the business of thought to define things, to find the boundaries; thought, indeed, is a ceaseless process of definition” (Palmer 134).  As Palmer noted, humans, by their very nature, attempt to define all things.  But, more than that, we attempt to redefine subjects and ideas that have already been defined so that we can better understand what they mean, where we came from, and, perhaps most importantly of all, who we are.  Writers, from the beginning of the written word through the present, have, almost in their entirety, str…  

Canterbury Tales – Linking Griselda of The Clerk’s Tale to the Biblical Sacrifice of Abraham

– Linking Griselda of The Clerk’s Tale and the Biblical Sacrifice of Abraham       The Clerk’s Tale seems to strike most readers as a distasteful representation of corrupt sovereignty and emotional sadism; few can find any value in Walter’s incessant urge to test his wife’s constancy, and the sense that woman is built for suffering is fairly revolting to most modern sensibilities. Nevill Coghill, for instance, described the tale as “too cruel, too incredible a story,” and he notes that “even Chaucer could not stand it and had to write his marvelously versified ironic disclaimer” (104-5)….