Order clerk Essay

Order clerk Essay

The Suffering Griselda in The Clerk’s Tale

–     In Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Clerk’s Tale,” from The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer describes a “perfect wife.”  This wife, Griselda, is totally submissive to her husband, and seems to have no regrets or remorse for anything he makes her do.  Griselda’s husband, Walter, puts her through many trials in order to test her dedication and loyalty to him.  He takes away both of their children, telling her that he is going to have them killed.  He then tells her that he is divorcing her and taking another bride.  After this, he forces her to prepare the new bride for him.  Through all of this, Griselda loves Walter without fail, meets his demands without any word of disapproval, and remains faithful…  

Canterbury Tales – Linking Griselda of The Clerk’s Tale to the Biblical Sacrifice of Abraham

– Linking Griselda of The Clerk’s Tale and the Biblical Sacrifice of Abraham       The Clerk’s Tale seems to strike most readers as a distasteful representation of corrupt sovereignty and emotional sadism; few can find any value in Walter’s incessant urge to test his wife’s constancy, and the sense that woman is built for suffering is fairly revolting to most modern sensibilities. Nevill Coghill, for instance, described the tale as “too cruel, too incredible a story,” and he notes that “even Chaucer could not stand it and had to write his marvelously versified ironic disclaimer” (104-5)….  

Present Job Analysis of a Clerk

– … I know to myself that this is not a productive attitude I should be having because it can have adverse effects being the face of the organization as it reflects my attitude and the kind of service I will provide to customers. In addition to that, colleagues maybe offended by my attitude, in which can create a negative work environment for them. Hence I have changed my perspective in regards to my attitude, and focusing on the goal that I am striving towards and enjoying the work rather than being frustrated….  

The Power Struggle in The Clerk’s Tale

– Through layers of narrators, The Canterbury Tales frequently critique meaningless conventions and abusive uses of authority. The Clerk’s Tale struggles with the subversive power inherent to passive submission, showing how it enables an inferior to exert control over those who cannot be dominated through direct means because of their complete and unquestioned authority. In the context of The Clerk’s Tale, Griselda and Walter have a very strange relationship in which a confusing power struggle develops out of Griselda’s complete submission….  

The Wife of Bath’s Tale and The Clerk’s Tale

– “The life so short, the craft so long to learn” (Famous Quotes). The Canterbury Tales is enriched with humanistic merit that allows the reader to sharpen his or her own craft of life. Specifically, “The Wife of Bath’s Tale” and “The Clerk’s Tale” are embodied with multiple struggles of life that pertain to life in the present. Despite seven centuries of society constantly evolving, the two stories’ plots can still be further analyzed through similar themes about relationships that pertain to modern society and how rhetorical strategy allows the audience to relate to the narrative characters….