Monk/nun Essay

Monk/nun Essay

Summary and Analysis of The Nun’s Priest’s Tale

– Summary and Analysis of The Nun’s Priest’s Tale (The Canterbury Tales) Prologue to the Nun’s Priest’s Tale: The Knight interrupts the Monk’s Tale, for as a man who has reached a certain estate, he does not like to hear tales of a man’s fall from grace. He would rather hear of men who rise in esteem and status. The Host refuses to allow the Monk to continue, instead telling the Nun’s Priest to tell his tale. The Nun’s Priest’s Tale: The Nun’s Priest tells a tale of an old woman who had a small farm in which she kept animals, including a rooster named Chanticleer who was peerless in his crowing….  

Secularism v. Spirituality in the Second Nun’s Tale

– Secularism v. Spirituality in the Second Nun’s Tale         In the General Prologue to the Canterbury Tales, Chaucer describes the men and women of the Church in extreme forms; most of these holy pilgrims, such as the Monk, the Friar, and Pardoner, are caricatures of objectionable parts of Catholic society.  At a time when the power-hungry Catholic Church used the misery of peasants in order to obtain wealth, it is no wonder that one of the greatest writers of the Middle Ages used his works to comment on the religious politics of the day.          Yet not all of Chaucer’s religious characters are failures in spirituality…. ;

“The Nun’s Priest’s Tale”: An Analysis

– The “General Prologue” provides us with no evidence as to the character of the Nun’s Priest. Only in the prologue to his tale do we finally get a glimpse of who he might be, albeit rather obtusely. As Harry Bailey rather disparagingly remarks: “Telle us swich thyng as may oure hertes glade./Be blithe, though thou ryde upon a jade” (p.235, ll2811-2812). I say this cautiously because much criticism has surrounded the supposed character of the Nun’s Priest, his role in the tale, and his relationship to the Canterbury Tales as a whole…. ;

Gothic Fiction: An Analysis of Space in The Monk

– Gothic Fiction: An Analysis of Space in The Monk. Space is inseparable part of every text of literature. In the Gothic fiction space is extremely important, as the Gothic fiction is mostly based on creating images connected with human perception. During the process of reading readers often use their imagination. Therefore, depiction of old castles, ruined abbeys, monasteries, subterranean passages, vaults, or secret panels, is a standard method of creating the atmosphere. As Izdebska claims, “[t]he subject of a story is event in some space, but also the space itself” (33)…. ;

Tuite’s Literary Criticism of Lewis’ The Monk

– Tuite’s Literary Criticism of Lewis’ The Monk I would like to preface this by saying that one of the things I learned from this exercise is that, just because an article exists in published form, does not necessarily mean that it is a good article. This is the conclusion I reached after plowing, dictionary in hand, through two articles that were, respectively, ridiculously elementary after one hacked through the jargon, and entirely absurd and unsupported. Disheartened, I went searching again, and this time, came up with “Cloistered Closets: Enlightenment Pornography, The Confessional State, Homosexual Persecution and The Monk,” by Clara Tuite, and it is this article that I am writing about… ;