Container crane operator Essay

Container crane operator Essay

Stephen Crane and The Civil War

– Stephen Crane and The Civil War One year after the publication of The Red Badge of Courage Crane released a continuation to the narrative in the form of a short story.  “The Veteran” characterizes an elderly Henry Fleming who recalls his first exposure to the experience of war.  Of the battle he remembers, “That was at Chancellorsville” (Crane 529-531).  While Crane never explicitly states the name of the battle in The Red Badge, the incidents mentioned in “The Veteran” indicate that the protagonist of each is one in the same (website).  Memories of his reasons for flight and sad recollections of the memory of Jim Conklin, the “tall soldier,” mirror the episodes mentioned in Crane’s second…  

Stephen Crane and The Civil War

– Stephen Crane and The Civil War         While merely speculative, some biographers claim that Crane began The Red Badge of Courage in response to a challenge made by an acquaintance urging him to write a war novel that exceeded the quality of Emile Zola’s Le debacle.  Crane, shortly thereafter, undertook the task and researched various articles in Century magazine on battles and leaders in the Civil War.  In several personal letters he writes of the process he underwent in producing the narrative and discusses his opinions and feelings in reference to the quality of his work.  While he generally concedes to the positive opinions surrounding its reviews, he makes a conscious effort to refut…  

Stephen Crane’s A Mystery of Heroism

– Stephen Crane’s A Mystery of Heroism Stephen Crane, an avant-garde writer of his time, forced his readers to look beyond his written words for a more underlined, meaningful moral in most of his stories. Crane follows a strict pattern in most of his work. His subject matter usually deals with the physical, emotional, and intellectual responses of ordinary people confronted by extraordinary, extreme experiences. Fairly common themes are presented in his writing, including fallen humanity and harsh realities; yet all seem to overlap in the category of heroism….  

Stephen Crane’s Maggie, A Girl of the Streets

– Stephen Crane’s Maggie, A Girl of the Streets Stephen Crane’s first novel Maggie (girl of the streets) is a tale of uncompromising realism. The story chronicles the titular Maggie, a girl who lives in the Bowery with her emotionally abusive parents and brothers Jimmie and Tommy. The novel revolves around the trials and tribulations of Maggie and her family in the Bowery. Highlights of the story include the death of Maggie’s father and brother Tommie which drive Pete to turn into a cold and hard person by novels end….  

Stephen Crane’s The Open Boat

– Stephen Crane’s “The Open Boat”        “None of them knew the color of the sky.” This first sentence in Stephen Crane’s “The Open Boat” implies the overall relationship between the individual and nature. This sentence also implies the limitations of anyone’s perspective. The men in the boat concentrate so much on the danger they are in, that they are oblivious and unaware to everything else; in other words, maybe lacking experience. “The Open Boat” begins with a description of four men aboard a small boat on a rough sea….